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Our mission is to educate New Yorkers and help them become engaged and empowered advocates for the environment. Our citizen’s toolkit articles will help you learn even more about issues we’re working and about recent forums we’ve hosted.

The NYC Department of Sanitation will resume its program to collect residential organic waste, which includes food scraps, food-soiled paper, and yard waste. In turn, these throwaways can be repurposed to create compost and energy, rather than releasing greenhouse gasses while decomposing in a landfill. Residents must sign up to request the service, either through…

The NYC Department of Sanitation will resume its program to collect residential organic waste for composting. Residents must sign up to request the service, either through an online form or by calling 311.

Together with our partners, we launched the NYC Clean School Bus Coalition to fight to phase out all school buses running on fossil fuels and transition to all-electric buses by 2040.

The Delaware River has fittingly received the award for “River of the Year” 2020 because of the many restoration and stewardship efforts led by nonprofit organizations across the four states. The story of the Delaware River is a good example of environmental progress that can happen when we all work together to protect our precious natural resources.

NYLCVEF teamed up with New York Lawyers for the Public Interest and other partners to draft a report on the negative health impacts of lead poisoning in NYC and review the city’s enforcement of its lead poisoning prevention law. The report found that city agencies have largely failed to enforce the primary prevention measures of the law.

On Monday, September 24th, we held a policy forum as part of our Clean Buses for Healthy Niños campaign for electric school buses in environmental justice communities. Panelists discussed the impacts of diesel pollution and pathways towards transitioning to an electric school bus fleet. Read the recap here,

We hosted a policy forum focused on the economic, social, and environmental benefits of green infrastructure (GI) as an approach to managing stormwater.

The Town of East Hampton has a long record of sustainability leadership, particularly on the issue of open space. But there are many steps the town can take to continue to improve its environmental performance–and the town’s elected leaders will play a critical role in this effort. For this reason, the New York League of…

Part four of NYLCV’s series of forums on “Getting to 80 x 50” focused on energy use and transmission within New York City, and how we can achieve the Mayor’s goal for 50% of the city’s energy to come from renewable resources by 2030.

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