Photo: Andrew Machlowski
Photo: Andrew Machlowski
Photo: Landa Palmer
Photo: Jessica Schoen

Coming Up:
Policy Forum

Join us for a full-day conference on how the Chesapeake Bay is connected to the Upper Susquehanna River Watershed.

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Educate

We educate New Yorkers about environmental issues and the environmental decision-making processes at the local, regional, state, and federal government levels.

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Engage

We engage all sectors – elected officials, policymakers, businesses, community groups and grassroots citizens – in open, non-partisan discussion about sustainability policies in order to achieve the environmental breakthroughs that New York needs.

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Empower

We empower New Yorkers to make environmental change by engaging them in the civic process. That includes registering voters, helping residents make their voices heard on environmental issues, and connecting New Yorkers with candidates, elected officials and policy makers.

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Become an Corporate Partner

With climate change and the greening of businesses making headlines every day, more corporations are partnering with environmental groups to demonstrate their commitment to sustainability and to connect with conservation-minded consumers and decision-makers.

Our Issues

New York State faces a wide range of sustainability challenges that differ from region to region. Jointly with NYLCV, the NYLCV Education Fund issues policy agendas that lay out specific legislative and budgetary remedies tailored to different levels of government or regions of the state. They serve as practical blueprints to help guide elected officials, policymakers, political candidates, voters and the general public toward a more sustainable future.

From the Citizen’s Toolkit

Recycling has resulted in a reduction of 1 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions in New York State, the equivalent of taking 211 million cars off the road for one year. You can do your part to help New York generate less trash and become more sustainable by making sure you’re properly sorting your recycling.

Many families travel during the summer while school is out and the weather is warm. Sometimes flying is the best way to get where you’re going, and while airlines are making small strides to become more fuel efficient, planes still contribute a large amount of carbon into the atmosphere. To make your vacation more environmentally friendly, we’ve put together some tips for you to consider when planning your next trip.

Summer is here, which means it’s grilling season! There are some steps you can take to reduce the toxins emitted at barbeques and make your party more environmentally friendly.

The average New Yorker creates 16.5 tons of trash per year. Although Americans are recycling now more than ever, it is crucial we take steps to create less trash and prevent landfills from continuing to grow in size and number. Here are some steps we can take to cut down on our trash and help our environment.

Reducing meat consumption has countless health, environmental, and economic benefits. Here are some tips explaining how Meatless Mondays can help on a personal and global level.

Spring is the perfect time to start your own garden! Gardening has many health and environmental benefits, such as the reduction of greenhouse gases, and the creation of habitats for small animals and insects. Gardening will help keep you active and has been known to reduce stress.

In an age where the internet is becoming easier for everyone to access, our ability to use this medium as a tool for reducing waste is also becoming much more convenient. Here are some ways you can use the internet to reduce paper and waste.

As we celebrate Chesapeake Bay Awareness Week, we remember the environmental, ecological, and economic significance of the estuary and how its conservation is imperative to the United States as a whole. Obstacles facing conservation in the Chesapeake Bay are made clear once one understands the many watersheds in New York. Here are some interesting facts about New York’s watersheds, including the Susquehanna River Watershed and its relevance to the Chesapeake Bay.

About one-third of what New Yorkers throw away can be composted. Food scraps and other organics do not break down in landfills the same way they do in compost piles. Not only does composting reduce waste, it also helps enrich soil used for growing trees and grass, improving our vital greenspaces. Anyone can compost, whether you live in a house or apartment.

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THANK YOU TO OUR CORPORATE PARTNERS